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Post Options Post Options   Quote Admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2019 at 00:35
I assume you have checked with your friends Jesus and Glen that they won't mind having their personal addresses splashed across the internet?   

We have data protection laws here in the UK about such things but perhaps the same does not apply in Australia. 

As a general guide - and wearing my boring old Admin hat here - I would not recommend anyone publishes any individual's address details on our forum as we cannot be held responsible for how it may be used.
I began this forum as a place to discuss and share ALL cinderella stamps. It is my first forum and is not perfect BUT I will endeavour to make it the best available.

Any positive help appreciated!
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2019 at 01:36
I suggest that the worst outcome that Jesus and Glen can expect from having their addresses shown on the envelopes is that people may actually try writing them letters.

But as stamp-collectors, such letters are normally welcomed.  Otherwise, how else do they get used stamps on cover?  (Buying them is not nearly as much fun as getting them in your letterbox!)
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Colin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2019 at 02:45
If I need to show an addressed cover online I normally blur or obscure the address, the bits that stamp collectors are interested in do not normally extend to the recipient's personal details.
Happiness doesn't come from getting something we don't have, but through recognising and appreciating what we do have.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 September 2019 at 16:03

Kemp Land 2019 Dinosaurs set.

The President of the Gay Republic of Kemp Land, His Excellency, President Aubrey McKinnon, has announced that a new set of stamps will be issued by the Kemp Land Post Office shortly, featuring Dinosaurs.

"The 30 cent stamp shows the Argentinosaurus," the President explained, adding "this is a genus of titanosaur sauropod dinosaur first discovered by Guillermo Heredia in Argentina.  The dinosaur lived on the then-island continent of South America somewhere between 97 and 93½ million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Period. It is among the largest known dinosaurs."

Gasps from the press gallery followed when the President unveiled the design for the 90 cent stamp. "This giant-size stamp features Tyrannosaurus rex, one of the most well-represented of the large theropods. Tyrannosauri lived throughout what is now western North America, on what was then an island continent known as Laramidia. Tyrannosaurus had a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the Maastrichtian age of the upper Cretaceous Period, 68 to 66 million years ago. It was the last known member of the tyrannosaurids, and among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event."

The President then explained about the $1.35 stamp, the inland registered mail rate. "This stamp shows the Quetzalcoatlus northropi, a pterosaur known from the Late Cretaceous  and one of the largest known flying animals of all time. It is a member of the family Azhdarchidae, a family of advanced toothless pterosaurs with unusually long, stiffened necks. Its name comes from the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god, Quetzalcoatl."

Finally, the top value was shown to the amazed journalists. "Patagotitan on the $3 stamp is a genus of titanosaurian sauropod from the Cerro Barcino Formation in Chubut Province, Patagonia, Argentina. The genus contains a single species known from multiple individuals: Patagotitan mayorum, first announced in 2014 and then validly named in 2017 by José Carballido, Diego Pol and colleagues. Contemporary studies estimate the length of the type specimen, a young adult, at 37 meters with an approximate weight of 69 tonnes," he elaborated.

The President concluded by urging youth to study the extinct dinosaurs, and urged them to take action to reverse climate change so that no more extinction events occur in our lifetime.

Originally posted by Wikipedia Wikipedia wrote:

The Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) extinction event, also known as the Cretaceous–Tertiary (K–T) extinction, was a sudden mass extinction of some three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth, approximately 66 million years ago. With the exception of some ectothermic species such as the leatherback sea turtle and crocodiles, no tetrapods weighing more than 25 kilograms survived. It marked the end of the Cretaceous period and with it, the entire Mesozoic Era, opening the Cenozoic Era that continues today.

In the geologic record, the K–Pg event is marked by a thin layer of sediment called the K–Pg boundary, which can be found throughout the world in marine and terrestrial rocks. The boundary clay shows high levels of the metal iridium, which is rare in the Earth's crust, but abundant in asteroids.

As originally proposed in 1980 by a team of scientists led by Luis Alvarez and his son Walter Alvarez, it is now generally thought that the K–Pg extinction was caused by the impact of a massive comet or asteroid 10 to 15 km wide, 66 million years ago, which devastated the global environment, mainly through a lingering impact winter which halted photosynthesis in plants and plankton. The impact hypothesis, also known as the Alvarez hypothesis, was bolstered by the discovery of the 180-kilometer-wide Chicxulub crater in the Gulf of Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula in the early 1990s, which provided conclusive evidence that the K–Pg boundary clay represented debris from an asteroid impact. The fact that the extinctions occurred simultaneously provides strong evidence that they were caused by the asteroid. A 2016 drilling project into the Chicxulub peak ring confirmed that the peak ring comprised granite ejected within minutes from deep in the earth, but contained hardly any gypsum, the usual sulfate-containing sea floor rock in the region: the gypsum would have vaporized and dispersed as an aerosol into the atmosphere, causing longer-term effects on the climate and food chain.

Other causal or contributing factors to the extinction may have been the Deccan Traps and other volcanic eruptions, climate change, and sea level change.

A wide range of species perished in the K–Pg extinction, the best-known being the non-avian dinosaurs. It also destroyed a plethora of other terrestrial organisms, including some mammals, pterosaurs, birds, lizards, insects, and plants. In the oceans, the K–Pg extinction killed off plesiosaurs and the giant marine lizards (Mosasauridae) and devastated fish, sharks, mollusks (especially ammonites, which became extinct), and many species of plankton. It is estimated that 75% or more of all species on Earth vanished. Yet the extinction also provided evolutionary opportunities: in its wake, many groups underwent remarkable adaptive radiation—sudden and prolific divergence into new forms and species within the disrupted and emptied ecological niches. Mammals in particular diversified in the Paleogene, evolving new forms such as horses, whales, bats, and primates. Birds, fish, and perhaps lizards also radiated.


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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 September 2019 at 20:42

Kemp Land 2008 Shackleton Expedition centenary set in minisheets.

To celebrate the centenary of the British Antarctic Expedition led by Sir Ernest Shackleton 1907 to 1909, the small Antarctic country Kemp Land issued a set of four stamps in 2008.

The designs:


5 cents ... Adelie penguins.

30 cents ... Shackleton's expedition ship, the "Nimrod", departing from Lyttelton for Antarctica, 1907.

75 cents ... The Beardmore Glacier, first discovered by Shackleton.

$3 ... Sir Ernest Shackleton (1874 - 1922).

===

This set was a joint issue with Mevu, which issued similar stamps.  The stamps appeared in the form of these two minisheets, so each Post Office purchaser got four sets of stamps.  Surprisingly, they are still on sale in Kemp Land. The five cent stamp has been reprinted in large sheets to allow for the huge demand for 5c stamps as a "make up rate".

Sir Ernest Shackleton (1874 – 1922) was an Anglo-Irish explorer who was one of the principal figures of the period known as the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. His first experience of the polar regions was as third officer on Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Discovery Expedition, 1901–04, from which he was sent home early on health grounds. Determined to make amends for this perceived personal failure, he returned to Antarctica in 1907 as leader of the Nimrod Expedition. In January 1909 he and three companions made a southern march which established a record Farthest South latitude 190 km from the South Pole, by far the closest convergence in exploration history up to that time. For this achievement, Shackleton was knighted by King Edward VII on his return home.

After the race to the South Pole ended in 1912 with Roald Amundsen's conquest, Shackleton turned his attention to what he said was the one remaining great object of Antarctic journeying -– the crossing of the continent from sea to sea, via the pole.

For more information on Kemp Land and its stamps, please visit the Kemp Land website, www.geocities.ws/kempland

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 November 2019 at 23:12
Originally posted by Panterra Panterra wrote:


Kemp Land 2019 Dinosaurs set.

The President of the Gay Republic of Kemp Land, His Excellency, President Aubrey McKinnon, has announced that a new set of stamps will be issued by the Kemp Land Post Office shortly, featuring Dinosaurs.

"The 30 cent stamp shows the Argentinosaurus," the President explained, adding "this is a genus of titanosaur sauropod dinosaur first discovered by Guillermo Heredia in Argentina.  The dinosaur lived on the then-island continent of South America somewhere between 97 and 93½ million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Period. It is among the largest known dinosaurs."

Gasps from the press gallery followed when the President unveiled the design for the 90 cent stamp. "This giant-size stamp features Tyrannosaurus rex, one of the most well-represented of the large theropods. Tyrannosauri lived throughout what is now western North America, on what was then an island continent known as Laramidia. Tyrannosaurus had a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the Maastrichtian age of the Upper Cretaceous Period, 68 to 66 million years ago. It was the last known member of the tyrannosaurids, and among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event."

The President then explained about the $1.35 stamp, the inland registered mail rate. "This stamp shows the Quetzalcoatlus northropi, a pterosaur known from the Late Cretaceous  and one of the largest known flying animals of all time. It is a member of the family Azhdarchidae, a family of advanced toothless pterosaurs with unusually long, stiffened necks. Its name comes from the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god, Quetzalcoatl."

Finally, the top value was shown to the amazed journalists. "Patagotitan on the $3 stamp is a genus of titanosaurian sauropod from the Cerro Barcino Formation in Chubut Province, Patagonia, Argentina. The genus contains a single species known from multiple individuals: Patagotitan mayorum, first announced in 2014 and then validly named in 2017 by José Carballido, Diego Pol and colleagues. Contemporary studies estimate the length of the type specimen, a young adult, at 37 meters with an approximate weight of 69 tonnes," he elaborated.

The President concluded by urging youth to study the extinct dinosaurs, and urged them to take action to reverse climate change so that no more extinction events occur in our lifetime.

Originally posted by Wikipedia Wikipedia wrote:

The Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) extinction event, also known as the Cretaceous–Tertiary (K–T) extinction, was a sudden mass extinction of some three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth, approximately 66 million years ago. With the exception of some ectothermic species such as the leatherback sea turtle and crocodiles, no tetrapods weighing more than 25 kilograms survived. It marked the end of the Cretaceous period and with it, the entire Mesozoic Era, opening the Cenozoic Era that continues today.

In the geologic record, the K–Pg event is marked by a thin layer of sediment called the K–Pg boundary, which can be found throughout the world in marine and terrestrial rocks. The boundary clay shows high levels of the metal iridium, which is rare in the Earth's crust, but abundant in asteroids.

As originally proposed in 1980 by a team of scientists led by Luis Alvarez and his son Walter Alvarez, it is now generally thought that the K–Pg extinction was caused by the impact of a massive comet or asteroid 10 to 15 km wide, 66 million years ago, which devastated the global environment, mainly through a lingering impact winter which halted photosynthesis in plants and plankton. The impact hypothesis, also known as the Alvarez hypothesis, was bolstered by the discovery of the 180-kilometer-wide Chicxulub crater in the Gulf of Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula in the early 1990s, which provided conclusive evidence that the K–Pg boundary clay represented debris from an asteroid impact. The fact that the extinctions occurred simultaneously provides strong evidence that they were caused by the asteroid. A 2016 drilling project into the Chicxulub peak ring confirmed that the peak ring comprised granite ejected within minutes from deep in the earth, but contained hardly any gypsum, the usual sulfate-containing sea floor rock in the region: the gypsum would have vaporized and dispersed as an aerosol into the atmosphere, causing longer-term effects on the climate and food chain.

Other causal or contributing factors to the extinction may have been the Deccan Traps and other volcanic eruptions, climate change, and sea level change.

A wide range of species perished in the K–Pg extinction, the best-known being the non-avian dinosaurs. It also destroyed a plethora of other terrestrial organisms, including some mammals, pterosaurs, birds, lizards, insects, and plants. In the oceans, the K–Pg extinction killed off plesiosaurs and the giant marine lizards (Mosasauridae) and devastated fish, sharks, mollusks (especially ammonites, which became extinct), and many species of plankton. It is estimated that 75% or more of all species on Earth vanished. Yet the extinction also provided evolutionary opportunities: in its wake, many groups underwent remarkable adaptive radiation—sudden and prolific divergence into new forms and species within the disrupted and emptied ecological niches. Mammals in particular diversified in the Paleogene, evolving new forms such as horses, whales, bats, and primates. Birds, fish, and perhaps lizards also radiated.


And here is the delightful FDC, fresh from the Post Office:


Kemp Land 2019 Dinosaur set on first day cover.

I have a few extras and happy to exchange with any collectors who also enjoy dinosaurs.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 November 2019 at 22:29
Originally posted by Colin Colin wrote:

If I need to show an addressed cover online I normally blur or obscure the address, the bits that stamp collectors are interested in do not normally extend to the recipient's personal details.


I hope your remarks didn't get seen by the evil Mister Photobucket!  He seems to have applied this blurring advice to all the early PHOTOS in this thread!

What an idiot the evil Mister Photobucket is!
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