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Stamps of Bruce Henderson

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2020 at 00:21
The previously-shown Letter-Writing Week stamps have a rather unfortunate spelling error that is present in the entire first printing: an extra T in Lettter.

Waikoa Island 2020 Letter-Writing Week, minisheet,
with corrected spelling of "letter".

In traditional philately, the expression RRR means exceedingly rare, so maybe TTT means exceedingly lettteriferous ?

The second printing has corrected the error, but now there is another error: one stamp has become tête-bêche.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Perky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 April 2020 at 22:46
"Save the Trees"...
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 April 2020 at 04:03
All the Raoul stamps are shown on their website:
http://www.angelfire.com/country/raoul/

Here are some of them.  And rumours persist that Madam President recently died without an heir.

So anyone keen to take over this small stamp-issuing country could apply now!


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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 April 2020 at 05:09
The Raoul  website also reveals the surprising information that the country has issued just one banknote: a 50 billion dollar:


It is believed that this note was printed so that they could use one to purchase their battleship (shown on the note.)
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 April 2020 at 19:06
Originally posted by Panterra Panterra wrote:

The Raoul  website also reveals the surprising information that the country has issued just one banknote: a 50 billion dollar:


It is believed that this note was printed so that they could use one to purchase their battleship (shown on the note.)


The battleship only cost $49 billion, so they got $1 billion in change.  
That was enough to pay the fuel bill for the ship for its first seventeen years of 
cruising round the Pacific
.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2020 at 14:35

AMAZING ERROR !
MAGGIE MAILBOX JAILBIRD !

This the first recorded copy of the Maggie Mailbox jailbird stamp.
Found today on a sheetlet of ten.


I visited the Minaue Post Office during my trip to Waikoa Island today, and examined their counter-book of stamps.  There are several other Letter-Writing Week minisheets with that error in stock.

I asked the Postmaster if he plans to sell these errors, and he says "Yes, they are just 35 tanos stamps, so are acceptable on mail."

So the first few applicants for a minisheet will probably end up with one!  (And I bought one sheet for my collection, since I was there.  But resisted the temptation to buy up the lot, to give other collectors a fair chance.)

Both the first printing (with the Lettter error) and the second printing (with the tête-bêche) sheets are on sale.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2020 at 19:37
Originally posted by Panterra Panterra wrote:

The Raoul  website also reveals the surprising information that the country has issued just one banknote: a 50 billion dollar:


It is believed that this note was printed so that they could use one to purchase their battleship (shown on the note.)

The battleship only cost $49 billion, so they got $1 billion in change.  
That was enough to pay the fuel bill for the ship for its first seventeen years of 
cruising round the Pacific
.


The change from the Raoul $50 billion banknote reminds me of a scene in the 2002 Steven Spielberg movie Catch me if you can, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks.

A prostitute is negotiating with Frank Abagnale [Leonardo DiCaprio] how much he would be willing to pay her if she spends the whole night with him. She finally gets him to offer $1000. But he needs to get the money. No worry, he will take a cheque down to the lobby and get it changed. Don't be crazy, it's 2am, they won't change a cheque at this time of night. But this is a Federal Reserve cheque, it's as good as cash.

Oh well, in that case she will accept his cheque. Ah, but it's made out for $1400, not $1000. Never mind, she'll accept it, and peels off four $100 dollar notes from her hidden stash as his correct change... The scene closes, but only Frank Abagnale and we the audience know that his $1400 cheque was yet one more of his high quality forgeries...
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2020 at 01:36
Here is a map of Waikoa Island, from their tourist brochure, for those wondering where it is:




Northwest Beach, near Kakariki, Waikoa Island.


Plastic pollution, near Takavau, Waikoa Island.

The plastic is not cast off by locals: this is all sea-borne trash from other countries, washed up on the shore.  
Locals once gathered this up, but no longer bother, as the Pacific washes tonnes more up every day.
  And having gathered it up, where do they put it?



Waikoa Island 2014 pictorial, Rs 2.35 featuring horses on the island.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2020 at 23:51
A colleague today asked why the map of Waikoa Island reminded him of a Rorschach test


Waikoa Island, a pleasant place to vacation in, and an
even more pleasant place to collect the stamps of.



Originally posted by Wikipedia Wikipedia wrote:

In the 1960s, research by psychologists Loren and Jean Chapman showed that at least some of the apparent validity of the Rorschach test was due to an illusion. At that time, the five signs most often interpreted as diagnostic of homosexuality were 1) buttocks and anuses; 2) feminine clothing; 3) male or female sex organs; 4) human figures without male or female features; and 5) human figures with both male and female features. The Chapmans surveyed 32 experienced testers about their use of the Rorschach to diagnose homosexuality. At this time homosexuality was regarded as a psychopathology, and the Rorschach was the most popular projective test. The testers reported that homosexual men had shown the five signs more frequently than heterosexual men. Despite these beliefs, analysis of the results showed that heterosexual men were just as likely to report these signs, which were therefore totally ineffective for determining homosexuality. The five signs did, however, match the guesses students made about which imagery would be associated with homosexuality.

The Chapmans investigated the source of the testers' false confidence. In one experiment, students read through a stack of cards, each with a Rorschach blot, a sign and a pair of "conditions" (which might include homosexuality). The information on the cards was fictional, although subjects were told it came from case studies of real patients. The students reported that the five invalid signs were associated with homosexuality, even though the cards had been constructed so there was no association at all. The Chapmans repeated this experiment with another set of cards, in which the association was negative; the five signs were never reported by homosexuals. The students still reported seeing a strong positive correlation. These experiments showed that the testers' prejudices could result in them "seeing" non-existent relationships in the data. The Chapmans called this phenomenon "illusory correlation" and it has since been demonstrated in many other contexts.

A related phenomenon called "invisible correlation" applies when people fail to see a strong association between two events because it does not match their expectations. This was also found in clinicians' interpretations of the Rorschach. Homosexual men are more likely to see a monster on Card IV or a part-animal, part-human figure in Card V. Almost all of the experienced clinicians in the Chapmans' survey missed these valid signs. The Chapmans ran an experiment with fake Rorschach responses in which these valid signs were always associated with homosexuality. The subjects missed these perfect associations and instead reported that invalid signs, such as buttocks or feminine clothing, were better indicators.


Despite the Rorschach test "blobs" sometimes looking like maps, the chart of Waikoa Island (which includes the carefully sculpted port area of Minaue) is unique, and accurately presents the physical shape of the island.


Waikoa Island 2014 pictorial, 35 tanos,
showing a huge Prickly Pear cactus bush,
inexplicably cultivated near Takavau, in northern Waikoa Island.


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Post Options Post Options   Quote Panterra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 May 2020 at 22:05
Originally posted by Panterra Panterra wrote:

This year, 2020, is the fiftieth birthday of Mevu, a small Antarctic republic first established in 1970, and which has been a steady stamp-issuer since then.

So to celebrate this birthday in a philatelic way, Waikoa Island joined other lands to  issue an attractive set of four stamps on 12th March 2020:



Waikoa Island 2020 50th anniversary of Mevu's Independence.


I see with all this discussion about Waikoa Island and its location and stamps, I somehow overlooked showing its miniature sheet celebrating the Mevu half-century.  So here it is:


Waikoa Island 2020 50th anniversary of Mevu's Independence, minisheet.

The stamps are printed in these small minisheets to make it easy to fit the sheet on an album page, and on covers. 
Hard to do that with a sheet of 100!

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.·:*¨¨*:·..·:*¨¨*:·..·:*¨¨*:·.

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