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The poster stamps of John Coulthard

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Post Options Post Options   Quote StampHinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The poster stamps of John Coulthard
    Posted: 03 August 2020 at 11:42
Below are the last two Coulthard labels done for the Western Stamp Collector.

Poster stamp # 39.  Magazine, Alabama.  I find no trace of Magazine on Google Maps or Wikipedia.  It seems to be one of those small towns that has disappeared from the map.


Poster stamp # 40.  Stamps, Arkansas.  Stamps is still very much with us. It is a town of 1,693 souls in 2010 and is located in far southwestern Arkansas in Lafayette County.  This is the only cover from this series that I have with a machine cancel. 

In summary, There appears to be a total of 41 images from the Western Stamp Collector's two series.  There are twenty each from the two series printed, plus # 00.  I'm not sure when or why 00 was printed, but its existence implies there may be a # 0 as well which would make a total of 42 poster stamps.

I still lack eight of the labels on cover.  My hope is to find them in my remaining collecting lifetime.

For those who like John Coulthard's cartoon drawings, there is a multitude of covers with cartoon cachets drawn by him.  With patience most can be purchased for under $10 U.S.  He also did cachets for the Washington Stamp Exchange and Cachet Craft, plus numerous generic drawings for U.S. Navy ship covers, and ads on the envelopes of stamp dealer Elmer Long.  His work is a collecting field in itself.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote StampHinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 July 2020 at 13:30
I continue the Coulthard poster stamps with # 34.

Poster Stamp # 34, Twin Sisters, Texas.  Twin Sisters is still on the map.  It is seven miles south of Blanco, TX, in Blanco County.  It dates from 1856 when the first post office was established.  The town name derives from a pair of nearby hills.  Twin Sisters' post office was discontinued in 1951.

Poster Stamp # 35, Twinfish, Washington.  Neither Google Maps or Wikipedia can locate a Twinfish, Washington.  The town seems to have dropped off the map. I have this item as a label only.  It will be interesting to see if I can find it on cover.

Poster Stamp # 36, Boggy Depot, Oklahoma.  Here is one from my home state.  Boggy Depot today is a ghost town, but was once a growing town in Indian Territory on the Butterfield Stage route.  It was in Atoka County about 12 miles east of Atoka.  The route of the Missouri, Kansas, and Texas railroad bypassed Boggy Depot and went through Atoka instead.  The town then began a steady and thorough decline.  The name is taken from nearby Boggy Creek and the location of a Confederate supply depot there during the Civil War.

Poster Stamp # 37.  I do not have # 37 and do not know, at this time, what town it represents.

Poster Stamp # 38, Hurry, Maryland.  Google Maps doesn't locate Hurry, MD,.  Wikipedia identifies it as a former unincorporated community in St. Mary's County.   Hurry's post office closed in 1959.

I will conclude this series of poster stamps in my next installment.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote StampHinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 July 2020 at 12:14
I begin this installment with #28.  Again, there are two labels that I do not have.

Poster Stamp # 28, Sleepy Eye, Minnesota.  Sleepy Eye is one of the larger towns in the series, ca. 3,300 souls, estimated population 2018, and still has its post office.  The town takes its name from a Sioux Indian chief of the 19th century.  Readers may have noticed that Ray Lewis, the addressee of this cover and other covers above, apparently put together a complete set of Coulthard's labels.  Included with this cover was his note to postmasters explaining his motives and asking for a clear cancel.  Since this information is rarely included with such covers, I have also posted an image of the note below.

Poster Stamp # 29, Roads End, California.  Roads End appears to be still on the map, but no post office today.  It is in Sequoia National Forest and looks to be about 50 miles north of Kerrville, CA.  This cover is postmarked (1941) later than any others I have.   

Poster Stamp # 30, I do not have an example of # 30 and do not know its town name.

Poster Stamp # 31, Bigfoot, Texas.  Bigfoot has a population of 410 in the 2010 census.  According to Wikipedia, it increased it population from 350 in 2000.  It is about 25 miles east of I-35 and about the same distance south of Devine, Texas. 

Poster Stamp # 32.  I do not have an example of # 32 and do not know the town name at this time.

Poster Stamp # 33, Dad, Wyoming.  Dad seems to be gone from contemporary maps.  Google Maps could not find it.  Dad's post office was discontinued in 1940.  It was in Carbon County, Wyoming.  Wikipedia says its name came from a local rancher A. T. "Dad" Corlett. 


Continued in a few days.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote StampHinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 July 2020 at 12:27
Thanks, Steve, for your comment.

No, I don't belong to the Cinderella stamp club, but I will look into joining.  As for an article, I'm not much into writing stuff, but might consider it.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Steve Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 July 2020 at 09:02
Don, are you a member of the Cinderella Stamp Club? I am sure that these would make an interesting article for The Cinderella Philatelist.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote StampHinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 July 2020 at 12:22
Thanks, Daniel, for your reply.  I share your "no comment" on # 21. 

Tonight, I am forced to begin with a label that I do not have, followed by skipping # 25 which is another with racial undertones.  Not all hat bad really, but racial tensions are so high these days someone would surely be offended.  As with # 7 1/2, I will be glad to send a scan of it via private email to anyone so requesting one. 

Poster stamp # 22, I do not have and do not even know its post office.

Poster stamp # 23, Wink, Texas.  A small town (940 population in the 2010 census) about 40 miles west of Odessa, Texas.  It is in oil country and it was the discovery of its oil field that led to the town's founding in 1926.  As of 2018, it still had a post office.


Poster stamp # 24, Ball Ground, GA.  Ball Ground is about 50 miles north of Atlanta.  It has a population of around 1,400 souls as of the 2010 census.  It takes its name from a field used by Cherokee Indians to play stick ball, a game similar to lacrosse. 


Poster stamp # 25, Talking Rock, GA.  Not posting due to the racial undertones of this item.

Poster stamp # 26, Hobo Hot Springs, California.  I have only this label, not on cover.  Hobo Hot Springs was a very small town in the Mojave desert.  It no longer has a post office and its name was changed in 1948 to Miracle Hot Springs.


Poster stamp #27, Harmony, Rhode Island.  Harmony had a population of circa 985 people in 2010.  It is within the town of Glocester, Rhode Island, and no longer has its own post office.



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Post Options Post Options   Quote Daniel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 July 2020 at 13:32
Loving the postmarks! I didn't think they were real places until I looked them up. No comment on the last one LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Quote StampHinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 July 2020 at 12:45
I continue tonight with John Coulthard's poster stamps, # 18 through 21. 

Poster Stamp # 18, Gasoline, Texas.  I cannot locate this town, so it probably no longer exists.  Given Texas' vast oil producing areas, it may have been a boom town where the oil wells dried up or a refinery town where the refineries closed. 

Poster Stamp # 19, Auto, West Virginia.  Auto still has a post office and is in very rural area of southeastern West Virginia. 

Poster stamp # 20, Detour, Maryland, still exists.  I do not have the Detour label on cover, but it is one of the few that I have as a stand alone label.  Detour is also the last label of the first series of 20 poster stamps done by Western Stamp Collector.  I hope to find it on cover soon.

Poster Stamp # 21, Bald Knob, West Virginia.  Bald Knob still exists and had its own post office until 2005.  It takes its name from a nearby mountain peak. 

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Post Options Post Options   Quote StampHinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 July 2020 at 11:26
Continuing chronologically today with John Coulthard's cartoon labels done for Western Stamp Collector in 1939.

Poster Stamp # 13, Pie Town, New Mexico.  Pie Town is still there.  It is in western New Mexico, on highway US 60, population a few over 180 souls in 2010.  I have actually been to Pie Town.

Poster Stamp # 14.  I do not have this label.  It depicts Painted Post, New York.

Poster Stamp # 15.  Social Circle, Georgia.  Social Circle is 45 miles east of Atlanta.  It is one of the larger towns of this series with a population of 4,000 plus residents.

Poster Stamp # 16.  Worry, North Carolina.  Wikipedia reports that Worry's post office was discontinued in 1944.  Don't know what the town's status is today.  It is the only one of these covers that I have addressed to a stamp dealer.  Perhaps, the dealer had several sets made up for resale.

Poster Stamp #17.  Horseshoe, Florida.  Google Maps does not find Horseshoe, Florida.  Its status is unknown to me.


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Post Options Post Options   Quote Steve Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 July 2020 at 12:17
A lovely collection to treasure.

It is heartening to see taht this sort of stamp does have a collector base. You have your reasons, and I have mine - part of the Laernu sphere. Now I have Venn diagrams in my mind.
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